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The Next Big Thing

I am so tired of the design world's homage to reclaimed, twenties-era environments.

Don't get me wrong - it was a grand idea at first. When Williamsburg's Moto (http://www.cafe-moto.com/) was the only place in town that had dimly lit prohibition era decor, it was something to behold. The food was excellent (anyone up for mussels and date cake? Or shall we get Oznot's Dish for takeout?), and the music perfectly suited the environment.  Freeman's followed suit in 2004 which opened a huge can of worms for the rest of the country.

So what is the next trend in restaurant design?

I would take inspiration from the late Bauhausian artist Eva Zeisel who passed on December 30th, 2011.  She was 105. Her pottery exhibits grace & fluidity, a stark contrast from today's rustic trends.

Eva Zeisel (November 13, 1906 – December 30, 2011)
Eva Zeisel (November 13, 1906 – December 30, 2011)
Eva Zeisel (November 13, 1906 – December 30, 2011)
Eva Zeisel (November 13, 1906 – December 30, 2011)
Eva Zeisel (November 13, 1906 – December 30, 2011)
Eva Zeisel (November 13, 1906 – December 30, 2011)

In the late 1880's, Art Pottery gained momentum. Potters combined animal & floral motifs of the Art Nouveau movement with linear shapes.  This transitioned pottery styles in the US to the Arts & Crafts period during the early 1900's.  Artists recognized during this time are Bauer & McCoy, know for their matte white pottery (Early Californian style).  I love the combination of Art Nouveau florals mixed with early deco lines in the McCoy piece below.

Early American Art Pottery - Bauer
Early American Art Pottery - Bauer

McCoy & Bauer also dedicated their craft to animal sculptures.

Portugese Pottery ELPA
Portugese Pottery ELPA
Sculpture, ELFA Portugal
Sculpture, ELFA Portugal
McCoy Sculpture - lines blurred
McCoy Sculpture - lines blurred

While searching for images, I found the ELPA piece on Ebay below. The purity of the lines are a perfect addition to any collected decor. 

Potter working Magic
Potter working Magic

How does all this pottery translate to Interior Design?  For starters, I love the look & feel of Gesso which can be heavily applied to an interior surface.

I love the consistency of Gesso. Art before Art happens.
I love the consistency of Gesso. Art before Art happens.

Creative Surfaces company Ambitec out of New Zealand has created a "Bone China" finish, seen below:

Bone China Finish by Ambitec
Bone China Finish by Ambitec

Will this become the Next Big Thing in Restaurant design?  I have no idea.  However, it would be a nice backlash to the rustic, heavy feel of today's Prohibition Design.  xoEB